Tag Archives: Outdoor concerts

The Truck!

Ah yes … The truck.

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First outing with the new array.

A 1995 Mitsubishi Fuso FH100, and I, the original owner,

What a machine!

The FH100 was a left over model the local dealer “found” sitting on a dock in Florida waiting for something to do … And did I have something for it to do!

I had had the pleasure of working with John Minnehan and his company “the Ultimate Video show” bringing a high tech video night club to lots of college campuses that were … Let’s just say … Off the beaten path!

Lots of miles … Lots of heavy gear … And lots of hours listening to some of the hottest dance music the 90’s had to offer … I am still in recovery!

But the truck was amazing at it. With a GVW (Gross Vehicle Weight) of over 17,000 pounds and weighing in at under 9,000 pounds empty the amount of gear it could handle was beyond belief … It surprised a lot of weigh station officials over the years … The sad look that would cross the faces of the DOT guys as they opened the door and read the GVW tag was always priceless!

But I digress …

The truck seems to have been built for my solar project. With it’s small size and super heavy duty frame, brakes, suspension and cargo restraining system moving a bunch of batteries around with the truck was going to be the easy part.

I wanted to find a better way to solar recharge the batteries between shows, and with business picking up I started looking up. With 120 square feet of flat roof on the truck, adding solar panels to the “attic” seemed like a good idea. If I could find a way to permanently mount an array on the truck I was going to save a lot of time and trouble moving batteries around.

I wanted to have the panels “rail mounted” flat above the box of the truck … With the rail system designed to protect the panels and any low hanging tree branches from each other!

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The rail mounting system

I was curious as to how well the panels would work laying flat … (Instead of being angled at the sun) … But was pretty certain after 2013’s experiment that I would be able to recharge the batteries … I was just not sure how much the process would speed up, or how much power I would get … Never mind what, if anything was going to happen on those short winter days with the sun low on the horizon.

Time would tell.

While the truck was being worked on I went through and rebuilt the charging station I had made for the project back in 2013, tidying things up a bit, adding a web monitor and a wireless router to connect the rig to my I-phone and maybe someday even the world!image

I think I’ll need to rent a teenager to get that far … Any leads on finding one would be greatly appreciated!

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The new array! Four Sun Tech 235 watt panels.

I got the truck back from the shop with the four solar panels installed on July 3, 2015 and spent the next two days adding the electronics and cabling … Personally drilling two holes in the truck roof for the “glands” that the cables were going to run through seemed really wrong … But the glands, and the silicone sealant that were used have kept everything nice and dry.

The next day I got up before sunrise and made it down to the truck as the sun was clearing the trees on the horizon and found I had already harvested .194 kWh of power … Before the sun had even hit the panels!

 

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Rise and shine … Time to get to work!

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“Old Guy” taking a “screen shot”, 7/6/2015

The readings I took from the web monitor at the end of the day showed that the charger went into “float” stage around noon … With a total harvest for the day of 1.41 kWh of power … I was not really sure what that meant … But I was impressed!

As I sit here on a Sunday morning in late January, with six months of learning “under my belt” I am still impressed!

As for the short days of winter … Yesterday, a sunny January 30, 2016 the Sirus Solar DS-201 web monitor showed I had put 143.7 amp hours of power back into my 12 volt battery bank … 1.72 kWh of power … Not bad for four 235 watt solar panels laying flat on a winter day in New England … Not bad at all!

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Screen shot from 1/30/2016

2013

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2013 was looking to be pretty exciting with the St. Patricks Day parade and the Easter sunrise service working so well … Though I was a little behind schedule with my plans to get meters installed and upgrading the wiring on all of the battery systems.

The rest of the parts had arrived … Finding time to install them was another story.

More shows, putting another battery system together and getting the meters installed in three of the systems kept me very busy through June … And I was starting to get some data that seemed to make a lot more sense … But I still had lots to learn.

One of the battery banks with the TRIMETRIC 2025 battery meter installed.

One of the battery banks with the TRIMETRIC 2025 battery meter installed.

I was planning on using the 2013 Elma Lewis Playhouse in the Park series to test how feasible the project really was. I had hoped to solar recharge all of the batteries between the weekly shows this year … And had ordered an MPPT (Maximum Power Point Tracking) solar charge controller to do it with … After doing a little math it seemed like my three 120 watt solar panels would be able to capture enough sunlight to recharge all the batteries during the week … Even allowing for a 50% operating efficiency … Something I hoped would be a conservative estimate … Especially with rain and clouds being a fairly common occurrence here in the Boston area.

My initial plan of setting up the solar panels and batteries on site for the series turned out to be a little naive … I had to scramble a little to get a “Plan C” up and running … My truck would be parked from Wednesday night until Monday afternoon and with a little help and a couple of tall ladders the solar “array” would be strapped to the top of my truck, the charge controller hooked up… And … Time would tell.

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PS … It worked great!

… Not just the loud parts!

The 2014 Pet Rock Festival … Second stage “tech world”

The generator had the day off ... The system ran for 5 hours and 15 minutes, used 1.7 kWh of power ... Only using 24% of the 550 amp hour battery!

The generator had the day off … The system ran for 5 hours and 15 minutes, produced 1.7 kWh of power … And only used 24% of the 550 amp hour battery!

When you replace the “traditional” gasoline or diesel generator with battery power some really neat things happen.

The first thing you might notice is that there is no noise.

And with no generator running in the background there are no exhaust fumes, no heat or extra cans of fuel to worry about. That means the batteries can be placed almost anywhere, eliminating the need for the long extension cords, cable ramps, tape … and the time normally involved with getting power where you need it!

Great seats!  ... They probably do not know they are sitting next to the "generator"!

Great seats! … They probably do not know they are sitting next to the “generator”!

With a properly sized battery system … there is no need to refuel … No flammable liquids … or downtime.

The batteries can be set up and used anytime, anywhere and theoretically can be sized to do almost anything.

Anything? … Well … Almost anything … Fairbanks is pretty small as far as cities go!

Fairbanks, Alaska has the world’s largest rechargeable battery (according to Wikipedia as of 6/17/14).

From the Golden Valley Electrical Association web site …

“Completed in December of 2003, the BESS (Battery Energy Storage System) can provide 27 megawatts of power for 15 minutes in the event of a generation or transmission related power outage.”

“The BESS responded to 60 events in 2013 … Preventing a total of 310,492 member outages … That’s an average of over 5,000 customers per outage!”

http://www.gvea.com/energy/bess

Their battery system was sized for the job … And from what I have read … Does the job very well.

My 12 volt systems are quite a bit smaller … My largest, a 1050 amp hour system is roughly the equivalent of a 6,000 – 8,000 watt generator … My smallest, a 276 amp hour system is roughly the equivalent of a 1,500 – 2,000 watt generator.

Perfect for a lot of small events and festivals!

When you use a battery system, power is removed from the batteries only as it is needed, with the rest of the stored power staying in the batteries … To be used as it is needed.

With a generator, electricity is produced at a constant rate and you use what you need … With any extra power /electricity from the generator being wasted.

With a battery system the louder things need to be … the faster the power is removed from the batteries … The loudest “peaks” of a performance draw the most power …  The spaces in between those peaks draw a lot less power from the batteries … With the quiet parts in between the notes drawing almost nothing at all … extending the running time of the system for the event.

Music with a wide dynamic range gets a double benefit when switching to a solar charged battery power source … Aside from being “clean and green” … The overall dynamic range is greatly improved by removing the “noise floor” created by even the quietest of generators.

You will be pleasantly surprised to hear even the quietest sections of the performance … Not just the loud parts!

Enjoying the sounds of the Boston Pops Brass Ensemble in beautiful Franklin Park, 6/24/2012

Enjoying the sounds of the Boston Pops Brass Ensemble in beautiful Franklin Park, 6/24/2012

OK … What next?

The 2012 Elma Lewis Playhouse in the Park series ended four weeks later with a crowd of people dancing in a warm rain to Ray Greene and his band.

It was a wonderful way to end to the concert series … With the heavy rain waiting until we were packing up the truck … Mother Nature’s own sigh of relief it would seem!

The buzz that had showed up in the self powered monitor went away with an upgrade to a sine wave inverter … it turned out that a very slight buzz was audible when some of my gear was plugged into either of the modified sine wave inverters that I had started the project with … A very quiet humm or buzz I had thought was “normal” when using a high gain sound system … Plugging any of the “offending” pieces of gear into the new sine wave inverter silenced them! … At least while running off of the battery power.

Plugging into a standard wall outlet …even a dedicated electrical “tie in” at some of the larger venues I work would get a noise of some sort … At times almost inaudible … But there if you really listened for it. Hmmmm… (Well buzzzzzzz actually!) …

Something else to think about!

Aside from that buzz the systems worked amazingly well … The “To good to be true” kind of amazingly well … With run times between 4.5 and 6 hours per day … And never coming close to using up the battery reserves … At least according to the inverter’s built in meters.

I had been powering what I thought was a decent amount of gear, about 6,0000 watts of loudspeakers and amplifiers, a mixing board, some processing equipment, all the band’s instruments and amplifiers … And after the first show … Even their cell phones! (I had been a little worried at the start and had not been willing to take those kinds of chances!)

So what next?

2012 was going to be my second year of providing one of the sound systems for the Reading Street Faire … A wonderful day of local bands playing to the home town crowd on a gorgeous Indian Summer day in early September.

(I have a few clients that would love to learn that weather secret!)

The town supplies a gasoline generator for the event and I supply a couple hundred feet of power cord, some cable ramps and a couple of carpet runners to get the generator as far away from the stage and audience as possible.

This year I set the batteries up at the stage and had the DPW folks leave their generator … Just in case.

My idea was to run my batteries dry … If I could!

I brought in the same PA I had used for the event in 2011, a much larger sound system than the one I had used for the Elma Lewis series in Franklin Park.

A 12,000 watt sound system … Two pairs of three way concert speakers, two pairs of subwoofers, six stage monitors … plus all the band’s amplifiers, pedal boards … even an electric keyboard or two … Rock and Roll stuff!

As a bonus … the Master of Ceremonies / DJ wanted to set up his system too!

Perfect … This should drain the batteries in no time!

Well … I thought it would!

About three o’clock in the afternoon the DPW guys asked if we were going to need the generator … And with the inverter’s meters all showing 90 – 100% full … I let them take it … They had a longer day going than I did … And I was not going to need it by the end of the event.

Even with all that gear running for 6 hours the battery meters still showed full … This was just not making any sense … with the kill a watt meters recording a little over 5 kWh of power used … Without putting much of a “dent” in the battery reserve!

My intuition was starting to tell me not to believe the inverter battery meters.

I needed to find out what was going on … Before running out of “juice” somewhere!

Hmmm … I wonder if AAA would give me a jump start!