Category Archives: Uncategorized

What Happened To The Sound

What happened to the sound?

I guess it got improved … Or something like that!

I do not think I am the only person wondering about this, but I may be the only sound guy who is.

Guitar players have been suporting a cottage industry of boutique tube amp makers for years, almost since the day Leo Fender sold his company to CBS back in 1965 (The Mesa Boogie company was formed in 1971, and I suspect the idea for the company started shortly after the tinkering began)

Guitar players have had it easy … Lots of choices!

Sound guys … Not so much … There does not seem to be a cottage industry of boutique sound systems to choose from.

So what did happen to the sound?

My best guess would be that business happened.

Folks who knew little or nothing about sound and music, but plenty about business took over, and to be fair, they have come up with some pretty neat things!

Large format sound systems are available today to safely and economically bring your sound to 1,000 to 99,000 of your closest friends (Coachella Music Festival, Indio, California). Small format sound systems, perfect for the GB or wedding gig, that won’t break the bank or your back. Decent gear is even finding it’s way into the local school’s AV closet for the annual play or dance recital. Easy to set up and use but somehow not quite what used to be called “High Fidelity”.

Loud enough and good enough most of the time, but perhaps not all of the time?

Sherman! Set the way back machine …

In the 1920’s the early sound inventors saw the need In the new “talkies” at the movie theaters for what eventually became that small self powered loudspeaker in the AV closet … A more reliable, louder and better sounding sound system

The next generation of audio engineers, some still wearing the trademark white lab technician’s coat started to tweak and tinker, improving the sound to the point where the term High Fidelity came into existence.

High Fidelity, defined by Merriam Webster.com as: “The reproduction of an effect (such as sound or an image) that is very faithful to the original”, (first used in 1938).

One of those early speaker designs, the Klipsch Corner Horn (patented in 1946) sounded so good that it is still in production today. Paul Wilbur Klipsch’s brain child still holds it’s own when paired with the proper amplifier. I’ve only heard them thru an old Macintosh tube amp, but I remember the pleasure of that first listening and have added them to my bucket list.

If you are not familiar, go find a pair and give them a listen. You may not be able to help smiling when you hear any of your favorite music played thru them.

They are big, unwieldy and if they did not sound so amazing would probably qualify as ugly!

Fair warning though … They are not cheap!

So … Just what is good sound?

That is a loaded question!

An easier question to answer would what is bad sound … Far fewer arguments!

Feedback … Distortion … Too loud … Not loud enough … Too shrill … Too bass heavy … Cannot hear someone / something … Are all prime examples of bad sound.

It occurred to me years ago that there might not be a correct answer to the first question … Bad sounds on the other hand are pretty obvious … Unaminously agreed upon by sound engineers, musicians and audience members alike.

So … I set about trying to get rid of as many of those “bad” sounds as possible, hoping that I might be left with something approaching the right answer to that first question.

Does the technique work? I’m happy to say yes … At least for me!

Will business “adopt” it?

I do not think so … You would have a hard time making more money selling less!

With the invention of the “talkies” a whole new industry was born

Things kept improving to a point where no-one was making a terrible sounding sound system.

The “high water mark” in my opinion was around the peak of the class A/B amplifier series designs. Plenty of power, wonderfully reliable and aside from a few tube purists, no complaints about the sound were heard!

Unfortunately this was not good for business.

Once you sold someone one of those amplifiers it was going to be a pretty long time before they were going to need to replace it!

Business was going to need to sell something if it was going to survive.

Taking advantage of the two weakest points of the “then” state of the art amplifiers (price and weight) by the horns as it were, a new series of lightweight amplifiers started being developed.

The class D amplifier was “born” and “business” was saved!

Well, the business of making and selling sound systems was saved.
I am not sure the actual sound business needed saving. We did get a lot of really neat, lightweight gear to use, but lost something in the High Fidelity department along the way. Things just did not seem to sound the same … Loud began to hurt … And what happened to the low end?

But no worries, the class D amplifiers are very handy at adapting. Readily interfacing with the new digital processing that is continually being developed, something that has done a great job of helping get things to sound better. But, aside from in some glossy magazine advertisements, I am not hearing anyone using the term “High Fidelity” to describe things … just yet.

I think perhaps I have some Missouri in my DNA.

When new gear came along I would give it a try.

If it was better than what I was currently using I would take out my check book and make the switch!

If not, tried and true was going to keep me going.

I bought one of the “new” Carver PM 1.5 amplifiers when they first came out and was really looking forward to the concept of 1,500 watts of power in that smaller 21 pound package.

I brought it back to the store in less than a week to see what was wrong with it … My Yamaha 2100 saved the day that first show when I was not getting enough low end out of my subs at the local frat house. I needed to swap out the new 1,500 watt amp with my spare, 120 watt per channel “old school” amp.

The dealer was very helpful. He pulled another PM 1.5 out of the box and fired it up in the show room and it seemed loud enough thru a full range speaker, but when we tried running just lows thru it, almost nothing, even with all those cool LED meters blinking red!

We both agreed that perhaps driving subs was not the proper place in a sound system for those particular 1,500 watts of power.

The dealer was happy to take the PM 1.5 back and sell me the CROWN Microtech 1000 that kept me happy until I discovered the Macro tech 2400 … Which kept me pretty happy until someone introduced me to the love of my low end life, the Macrotech 5000 VZ.

That was a long time ago, but the love affair, like my carefully maintained 5000 VZ’s, is still going strong!

I have tried out the I-Tech 10,000’s and find that I prefer the sound of the older, heavier, less powerful VZ’s. It seems to me that the 5000’s are the right “tool” for the job. For now, when I have the capability of “tying in” to get the four 30 amp circuits needed to keep me and my four Macrotech 5000 VZ’s happy, I’ll do it!… The smiles in the audience or out on the dance floor make lugging all that weight and cable around worth it.

So what next?

The business of the sound business is still driving things forward, towards what someday may again be called high fidelity.

I suspect and hope someone will develop a hybrid technology that takes advantage of what we “knew” 30 years ago and all of the DSP we have available today to get beyond the limitations of both the new and old “schools”.

My check book is ready!

Something to smile about.

I am incredibly near sighted … And have been so, as far as I know, all of my life.
Oddly … This was not discovered until I was in the second grade!

The human body is very resourceful and will try to adjust to make up for any challenges it encounters. In my case, with my vision being somewhat less than perfect, my hearing seems to have jumped into overdrive. The amazing thing to me is that this adjustment was not noticed until I was seven. Life was just normal!

Getting eyeglasses was huge. Wearing glasses sucked! Tickled the nose … Hurt the ears, but, oh the sights! … Trees had leaves! Facial expressions were a new phenomenon to me and television suddenly got a lot more interesting … At least until the novelty wore off!

It has taken several decades to realize that not everyone heard the world the same way I did. When 20/20 vision was handed to me as a little kid I did not immediately stop using the hearing skills I had developed. 

What skills you might ask?

Well … Have you ever been to the beach on a hot summer day?

 
It is a wonderful way to get away from the heat, and if it were not for all the other people trying to do the same thing, finding a place to set up the family blanket and beach supplies would be pretty easy.

Imagine yourself there … The sound of the waves crashing along the shore and the gulls overhead. Go down to the water and close your eyes … Now, add the noise of all those people. Not being able to see more than a couple of feet in front of you is going to make getting back to that blanket a bit more of a challenge.

My solution to the problem, that I did not know existed, was to just run up and down the beach yelling “mom!”. When I heard her I would know where she was … Blanket, cooler and sun tan lotion … and I would go … Normal!

Aside from being a very nearsighted and loud kid, it seems that I was incredibly skinny. All knees and elbows as it were, and if I have understood my mom correctly, with my ribs sticking out!

When she heard me she did not immediately yell back. She was afraid people would know who was responsible for starving this poor child, When I ran by she would answer loud enough for me to hear her, but not much more.

Echo locating? 

Hmmm … Apparently I was more than just “blind as a bat” … And perhaps things were not quite so normal after all.

Fortunately I wound up falling into a profession where my “ears” would be an asset. For the last thirty plus years I have been working in the entertainment industry as an audio engineer … A sound guy … And being able to pick sounds out in a crowd has been incredibly handy!

I love sounds … All sounds … Even that “teeth on the chalkboard” screech of a sound … I still cringe … But I do love it!

It has been a lot of fun learning how sound behaves, finding ways, tools and tricks for making things louder, occasionally a lot louder! More often then not, most people are not aware of what things coming off the stage I have made louder. 

To me the ultimate goal is making it louder without it sounding louder …creating the illusion that there is no amplification at all. Surprisingly, it turns out that it can still be loud without the audience minding that it is loud.

The right microphone used in a certain way with a high fidelity sound system can leave the audience wondering if there is a sound system there at all.

Now close your eyes again … This time the noise and mayhem of the beach is replaced by something you might not expect … You are at a concert and an artist is on stage … And you hear them, not the sound system.

If you are like me … You may find yourself smiling.

The Truck!

Ah yes … The truck.

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First outing with the new array.

A 1995 Mitsubishi Fuso FH100, and I, the original owner,

What a machine!

The FH100 was a left over model the local dealer “found” sitting on a dock in Florida waiting for something to do … And did I have something for it to do!

I had had the pleasure of working with John Minnehan and his company “the Ultimate Video show” bringing a high tech video night club to lots of college campuses that were … Let’s just say … Off the beaten path!

Lots of miles … Lots of heavy gear … And lots of hours listening to some of the hottest dance music the 90’s had to offer … I am still in recovery!

But the truck was amazing at it. With a GVW (Gross Vehicle Weight) of over 17,000 pounds and weighing in at under 9,000 pounds empty the amount of gear it could handle was beyond belief … It surprised a lot of weigh station officials over the years … The sad look that would cross the faces of the DOT guys as they opened the door and read the GVW tag was always priceless!

But I digress …

The truck seems to have been built for my solar project. With it’s small size and super heavy duty frame, brakes, suspension and cargo restraining system moving a bunch of batteries around with the truck was going to be the easy part.

I wanted to find a better way to solar recharge the batteries between shows, and with business picking up I started looking up. With 120 square feet of flat roof on the truck, adding solar panels to the “attic” seemed like a good idea. If I could find a way to permanently mount an array on the truck I was going to save a lot of time and trouble moving batteries around.

I wanted to have the panels “rail mounted” flat above the box of the truck … With the rail system designed to protect the panels and any low hanging tree branches from each other!

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The rail mounting system

I was curious as to how well the panels would work laying flat … (Instead of being angled at the sun) … But was pretty certain after 2013’s experiment that I would be able to recharge the batteries … I was just not sure how much the process would speed up, or how much power I would get … Never mind what, if anything was going to happen on those short winter days with the sun low on the horizon.

Time would tell.

While the truck was being worked on I went through and rebuilt the charging station I had made for the project back in 2013, tidying things up a bit, adding a web monitor and a wireless router to connect the rig to my I-phone and maybe someday even the world!image

I think I’ll need to rent a teenager to get that far … Any leads on finding one would be greatly appreciated!

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The new array! Four Sun Tech 235 watt panels.

I got the truck back from the shop with the four solar panels installed on July 3, 2015 and spent the next two days adding the electronics and cabling … Personally drilling two holes in the truck roof for the “glands” that the cables were going to run through seemed really wrong … But the glands, and the silicone sealant that were used have kept everything nice and dry.

The next day I got up before sunrise and made it down to the truck as the sun was clearing the trees on the horizon and found I had already harvested .194 kWh of power … Before the sun had even hit the panels!

 

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Rise and shine … Time to get to work!

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“Old Guy” taking a “screen shot”, 7/6/2015

The readings I took from the web monitor at the end of the day showed that the charger went into “float” stage around noon … With a total harvest for the day of 1.41 kWh of power … I was not really sure what that meant … But I was impressed!

As I sit here on a Sunday morning in late January, with six months of learning “under my belt” I am still impressed!

As for the short days of winter … Yesterday, a sunny January 30, 2016 the Sirus Solar DS-201 web monitor showed I had put 143.7 amp hours of power back into my 12 volt battery bank … 1.72 kWh of power … Not bad for four 235 watt solar panels laying flat on a winter day in New England … Not bad at all!

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Screen shot from 1/30/2016

No time to lose.

Solar powered 9 volt batteryThe project had been working out nicely … But what to do with it?

The technical side of the project was going to be a pretty simple evolution … Make the systems more efficient, easier to move around / recharge and capable of handling larger / longer events.

Getting a small array of solar panels permanently mounted on my truck was added to my “to do list” … But the truck was going to need some work before attempting that project … Two weeks after the end of the 2013 Elma Lewis concert series the injector pump on my 1995 Mitsubishi FH decided it had had enough … An expensive “operation” for an eighteen year old patient approaching the 300,000 mile mark! … More stuff to figure out!

Letting people know about the project was going to be a little more interesting.

Facebook, Twitter and Blogs are all new enough that my laptop’s spell check questions their existence! … And I’m a lot older than my laptop!

Help was going to be needed!

Clara Rhee … One of the tech’s I hire to help out with some of my events has a degree in comparative media studies from MIT …and she was willing to try to explain a bit about web sites, Blogs, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, You Tube … by then my head was spinning. This was something I was not going to be able to adapt to in a day or two!

So a plan was put together for getting a web site and perhaps a You Tube video (or three) to start to letting the rest of the world know about the project.

Lots to learn and no time to lose. I was not going to get any younger … And things showed no signs of slowing down so that I could catch up!

Help came, as it sometimes does, rather unexpectedly.

I broke my collar bone trying to … Well, it’s a long story … Let’s just say that I have never been accused of being graceful!

I’ve had more than my share of broken bones … The collar bone bringing my total up to 14 … my least favorite to date, by a large margin … Without even having a cast to sign!

There is not much you can do when you break your collar bone. In the early stages of recovery even sneezing is to be avoided if at all possible!

So … With my right arm tied up for the next four to six weeks I started this blog and began catching up with all sorts of things “technical” …. Something that I had been putting off … For way too long … There really was no time to lose!

… Not just the loud parts!

The 2014 Pet Rock Festival … Second stage “tech world”

The generator had the day off ... The system ran for 5 hours and 15 minutes, used 1.7 kWh of power ... Only using 24% of the 550 amp hour battery!

The generator had the day off … The system ran for 5 hours and 15 minutes, produced 1.7 kWh of power … And only used 24% of the 550 amp hour battery!

When you replace the “traditional” gasoline or diesel generator with battery power some really neat things happen.

The first thing you might notice is that there is no noise.

And with no generator running in the background there are no exhaust fumes, no heat or extra cans of fuel to worry about. That means the batteries can be placed almost anywhere, eliminating the need for the long extension cords, cable ramps, tape … and the time normally involved with getting power where you need it!

Great seats!  ... They probably do not know they are sitting next to the "generator"!

Great seats! … They probably do not know they are sitting next to the “generator”!

With a properly sized battery system … there is no need to refuel … No flammable liquids … or downtime.

The batteries can be set up and used anytime, anywhere and theoretically can be sized to do almost anything.

Anything? … Well … Almost anything … Fairbanks is pretty small as far as cities go!

Fairbanks, Alaska has the world’s largest rechargeable battery (according to Wikipedia as of 6/17/14).

From the Golden Valley Electrical Association web site …

“Completed in December of 2003, the BESS (Battery Energy Storage System) can provide 27 megawatts of power for 15 minutes in the event of a generation or transmission related power outage.”

“The BESS responded to 60 events in 2013 … Preventing a total of 310,492 member outages … That’s an average of over 5,000 customers per outage!”

http://www.gvea.com/energy/bess

Their battery system was sized for the job … And from what I have read … Does the job very well.

My 12 volt systems are quite a bit smaller … My largest, a 1050 amp hour system is roughly the equivalent of a 6,000 – 8,000 watt generator … My smallest, a 276 amp hour system is roughly the equivalent of a 1,500 – 2,000 watt generator.

Perfect for a lot of small events and festivals!

When you use a battery system, power is removed from the batteries only as it is needed, with the rest of the stored power staying in the batteries … To be used as it is needed.

With a generator, electricity is produced at a constant rate and you use what you need … With any extra power /electricity from the generator being wasted.

With a battery system the louder things need to be … the faster the power is removed from the batteries … The loudest “peaks” of a performance draw the most power …  The spaces in between those peaks draw a lot less power from the batteries … With the quiet parts in between the notes drawing almost nothing at all … extending the running time of the system for the event.

Music with a wide dynamic range gets a double benefit when switching to a solar charged battery power source … Aside from being “clean and green” … The overall dynamic range is greatly improved by removing the “noise floor” created by even the quietest of generators.

You will be pleasantly surprised to hear even the quietest sections of the performance … Not just the loud parts!

Enjoying the sounds of the Boston Pops Brass Ensemble in beautiful Franklin Park, 6/24/2012

Enjoying the sounds of the Boston Pops Brass Ensemble in beautiful Franklin Park, 6/24/2012

Easter Sunrise Service, Castle Island, Boston.

In the mean time …

Easter sunrise service on Castle Island in South Boston …Wow!

The view to the east is amazing. I am not going to try to describe it, but it is worth getting up early for … At least once!

I had been providing the sound system for the event for a couple of years and had really enjoyed setting up the sound gear in the dark and watching the new day arrive.

Easter morning view from Castle Island

The airplanes are not landing at Logan airport across the harbor at 4:00 in the morning and you can actually hear the harbor, the sound of the waves hitting the shore, some large ships going by … Add the flash of light from Boston Light and the slightest hint of change out on the horizon … It is very nice!

This year I had asked my contact with the Castle Island Association if I could try powering the event with one of my solar powered battery rigs and he said yes!

Normally … By the time most of the people arrive for the Church service the generator is already running with its constant drone covering up everything but the “red eye” flights coming in and the occasional overhead sea gull.

This year the first sound breaking the harbor “soundtrack” was the “Good Morning” from the priest celebrating the Mass … I’m sorry if it startled anyone!

The system ran for 2.5 hours and used .35 kWh of power … a tiny amount by any standard. Basically the “idling” current draw from having the four wireless microphones,  mix rack and amplifier on … With no background noise to compete with, the overall sound level did not need much power to cover the audience standing an an area almost the size of a football field.

The small “solar system” I brought to power the event was about the same size and weight as the generator that I helped off load from the park rangers utility tractor in previous years. Something else to think about … Eventually!

But back to rewiring …

The battery systems had worked wonderfully at powering the events so far. But I had unknowingly been getting a little help from good old fashioned “dumb luck”.

If this project was to get out of the tinkering stage I wanted to do it without needing that help.

Adding the battery meters was going to provide some very useful information, adding fuses was going to keep everything and everyone safe … and spending a little “quality time” with my coffee pot and calculator was going to get the systems performing as well as they could … For a long long time!

To find out how long you will have to check back later … Hopefully much later!

In working with 12 volt DC power it is very important to size everything for what you are trying to do … In my case … Powering all the equipment needed for an outdoor concert.

Sizing the wire used and laying out the equipment so that as little power as possible is lost to resistance in the wiring of the system … Ideally keeping the loss between the batteries and the inverter to less than 1%

To do that I needed to use the largest, shortest wires possible.

Using a voltage drop calculator like the one found in  “rapidtables.com”  you can see what size wire you will need to use. For this part of the project I used short (18″) #2 cables to go from each of the batteries to a pair of insulated buss bars, and total of about 8′ of #2/0 cable to get from the buss bars, through a circuit breaker, fuse and shunt to the inverter and back again.

If I’m doing my math correctly I am only losing .1463 volts (1.17%) to voltage drop with a 200 amp, 12.5 volt DC load … A little more power than what you could get from a standard household 20 amp circuit.

It sounds like an awfully small amount of loss to get excited about, until you realize almost everything in a 12 volt system will shut down when the voltage drops below 10.5 volts. Losing .1463 volts from 12 volts does not seem like much … But if you only get to “play” with the 2.4 volts between 12.9 volts (a full battery “at rest”) and the 10.5 volt “shut off point” … Losing that .1463 volts means I would lose between 5 and 8% of my total power at full current … And if I wanted to keep the batteries alive as long as possible I do not want to discharge them fully … I could be losing over 10% of my power … to wire!

Yikes!

I am hoping to give you a little “photo” tour of how I wired one of the systems in my next post.

Luck of the “Irish”!

In the mean time … The show must go on … The rewiring project was going to have to wait.

3/17/2013 … If you live in Boston that date can only mean one thing …

The South Boston St. Patricks Day Parade … Where being Irish is not really required!

I got a call from Mike Majorowski wondering if my battery system would be able to power a float for his band in the parade.

Hmmmmm…..

To see if it could be done I set him up with a couple of “Kill-A-Watt meters to use at his next gig to see how much power they would need … While I started to worry about the weather. Rumor has it that batteries do not like the cold!

With the readings he got from the “Kill-A-Watt meters It looked like my smaller battery system would do the job … At least if the weather co-operated and we got that perfect 77 degree day the batteries were rated for (this is Boston … and I’ve shoveled snow in May!)

I explained my “concerns” to Mike and we decided to try the parade using my larger system … At the smaller system’s price.

We had a beautiful sunny day for the parade … If you don’t mind a little cold wind … We started sound check at 10:00 am at 28 degrees And got all the way up to a “balmy” 37 degrees somewhere along the parade route!

Five hours of run time, 1.83 kWh of power used … We even got a nice “Cool!” From the Boston Police Truck team inspecting all the floats when they asked where we were getting our power from … apparently we did not need a special permit for using a generator on the float … Cool indeed!

At the end of the day the inverter battery meters still showed 90 – 100% full … It would have been nice to have the new meters installed … The parts had arrived … the extra time needed to install them was still on back order!

It was my first event moving the battery boxes around by myself and one thing was certain … Those battery boxes are heavy … Very heavy!

The larger battery system with the Trimetric 2025 meters installed

The larger battery system with the Trimetric 2025 meters installed

The larger system consists of a pair of “Site Safe” tool boxes with each box weighing in at about 500 pounds! … So “portable” is a relative term!

Moving them from the truck to a loading dock, or in this case … To the back of the “roll off” tow truck that was used for the float was pretty easy … Pushing them up the ramp to my truck? … Not so much!

Moving them around was going to take three or four people … Or a lift gate on the back of the truck … I will need to figure that one out later …

My to do list keeps growing!

Back to the drawing board!

Oh well … It turns out almost everything I did on my first attempt at going solar was wrong.

Wrong wire sizes, wrong lengths, wrong assumptions about how a bank of batteries should be wired … All of which made for a lot of possible failures.

Overestimating how much power I would actually be using … And more than a little good luck keeping any of those failures from happening!

So … Back to the drawing board …

The first “order of business” was to get a real metering system installed … It was time to find out what was really going on with the batteries.

I needed a “gas gauge” I could trust.

The Trimetric meters from Bogart Engineering are highly recommended by a lot of folks. … I decided to try the 2025 RV model for the project.

The 2025 is a very neat device that keeps track of the power in Amps  going in to and out of the batteries … A quick look will tell you the voltage. Press a button and you will see how much power is going into or out of the batteries. Press the button again and the meter will tell you the batteries are 87% full (… Or 18% full … It might be time to start thinking about worrying … Soon!).

In any case … More information than I could have hoped for!

The folks from Bogart Engineering have designed the meters to do a lot more … But those three things were going to answer a lot of my questions … And keep me out of trouble … For a little while at least!

Adding the meters to my “rigs” was going to take some rewiring … and some math … More on that later.

Since I was going to have to get in and do some rewiring to install the meters it made sense to go in and fix as many of my wiring mistakes as possible … My good luck was only going to get me so far!

If  you’ve been following along since the beginning you may remember my first big battery powered show having some yellow “warning” LEDs flashing on one of the inverters. The band had not gotten any louder … But something had changed … It took over a year to figure out what had happened … the power in the batteries was not getting to the inverter.

Resistance was “robbing” the system of power.

The wire I was using was too small and too long for the current that was trying to get from the batteries to the inverter … Causing a voltage drop … Causing the inverter to “ask for more power from the batteries … Causing the resistance to go up …causing more voltage drop … Causing …

It was a good thing I pulled the amplifier from one inverter and plugged it into the other inverter when I did … Or that show might have been the last!

My common sense approach was not helping at all … Luck … On the other hand … Was!

When using batteries to power something you do not want to waste anything. Leaving a 60 watt light bulb on overnight will “eat up” a lot of your battery reserve. It can be done … You just need more batteries … And solar panels to make it happen.

A little common sense would tell you … If you do not need it … Turn it off!

Common sense probably won’t tell you how much power will be wasted by using the wrong wire. Too small or too long of a wire could waste as much power as that 60 watt light bulb.

When using DC power a good “rule of thumb” is always use the largest, shortest wire you can.

So … I bought a bunch of larger wire to replace the stuff I had started the project with, ordered some meters, shunts, heavy duty buss bars, fuse blocks, fuses, lugs, heat shrink tubing … and my new favorite tool … A hand held crimper capable of hand crimping up to # 4/0 cable!

I wanted my systems to perform as well as they could … The solar powered equivalent of a finely tuned sports car as it were.

I’m afraid I’m going to be  seeing lots of 4/0 in the near future …

January, 2013 … and the Flu!

January, 2013, a book to read, some questions to answer … And the flu!

“Armed” with my trusty old iBook G4 and the second last dial up internet connection on the planet …  it was time to try “Googling”again!

(I really hope I am not that last person still on “dial up”)

It turns out there is some very good information out there … Mostly hidden in between some small scale items used to charge your cell phone or iPod … and some amazing systems even I find too incredibly good to be true … But perhaps … I’m still learning here!

Searching for solar power will overwhelm you … Narrowing the search down a bit to solar powered sound will get you a lot of neat things to play your iPod on, an interesting sound art project … And if you look far enough you will find …

Www.solarpoweredsound.com

Some nice photos of a couple of portable solar power systems being used at events … But I was not able to find out more.

A lot more searching, will get you to the North Texas Renewable Energy Group’s “Solar Shuttle” … A very impressive silent portable power generator … That happens to be solar powered … Wow!

Www.ntreg.org

They keep redesigning their web site … So you may have to look a bit.

This morning (8/25/2014) I found it in the “member projects” page under “The Solar Shuttle solar trailer” link.

Make sure you check out the link to the “PDF photo journal”

Wonderful stuff to find, but no help with finding any answers to my questions.

… Until Steve Gagnon sent me a link to Handy Bob Solar!

http://handybobsolar.wordpress.com/the-RV-battery-charging-puzzle-2/

Thank you Steve! … And Bob!

Bob has been “boondocking” … living off the grid … for years … And had to try a lot of things to get a solar power system to work on his RV.

Check out his blog … But start a fresh pot of coffee and get comfortable first … He has a lot to share with anyone willing to take the time. And if you are interested in off grid solar power … find the time. What “Handy Bob” has to say is worth it!

A lot of why someone boondocks gets lost as soon as you start up a generator … The peace and quiet of the wide open spaces is easily overwhelmed by even the quietest of internal combustion engines.

Bob seems to have his feet firmly on the ground of common sense … And what he was running into trying to set up a working solar power rig for his RV did not seem to follow what his common sense was telling him … It should work … The question was why didn’t it.

Backwards from my questions by about 180 degrees … It shouldn’t work … So why is it?

My problem was that I was overestimating what was going on … Leaving me with extra power at the end of the day … In the RV world … It seems that underestimating what was going on was leaving a lot of people with not enough power at the end of the day.

I have the easier problem to solve.

I have learned a lot … And will continue to learn  from Bob and the other folks out there who have taken the time (and spent the money) figuring out how to make off grid solar work.

Thank you all for sharing!

Now to put some of those lessons to work!